Vitamin C for reducing gout

A large, long-term study links higher vitamin C intake with a lower risk of gout.

Investigators examined the relation between vitamin C intake through food and supplements and gout risk in 46,994 men taking part in the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-up Study. None of the men had a history of gout at baseline.

During the 20 years of follow-up, 1,317 confirmed cases of gout occurred, with the risk much higher in men consuming 1,500 mg per day of the nutrient was up to 45% lower (relative risk: 0.55). Men between those two extremes also benefited, with fewer gout cases observed among the 500-999 mg per day group (relative risk: 83) and the 1,000-1,499 mg per day group (relative risk: 0.66).

“The present study provides the first prospective evidence about the inverse association between vitamin C intake and risk of gout,” wrote the authors, also noting that increasing vitamin C intake may help prevent gout.

Vitamin C is an important anti-oxidant, helps protect against cancers, heart disease, stress, it is part of the cellular chemistry that provides energy, it is essential for sperm production, and for making the collagen protein involved in the building and health of cartilage, joints, skin, and blood vessels. Vitamin C helps in maintaining a healthy immune system, it aids in neutralizing pollutants, is needed for antibody production, acts to increase the absorption of nutrients (including iron) in the gut, and thins the blood. Just to mention its most important functions.

Any fruit, or natural portion (e.g. slice of melon, or a handful of berries) in the chart below which has from 6 to 15 milligrams of vitamin C and is not highly packed with sugars is regarded as a ‘good’ source. Some very sweet fruit, such as apples, can be regarded as fairly good sources because they have more than 6 milligrams a serving, but not much more. Some very acid fruit, for example Surinam cherry, have ‘good’ absolute levels in the flesh, but are both small and unpalatable, so only one or two would ever be eaten at any one time. Therefore they are ranked lower than more acceptable fruit of a similar size and vitamin C content.

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Any fruit, or natural portion (e.g. slice of melon, or a handful of berries) that gives from about 15 milligrams to about 30 milligrams can be considered a ‘very good’ source of vitamin C

When a fruit or natural portion (e.g. slice of melon, or a handful of berries) has more than about 30 milligrams per serving, it is an ‘excellent’ source of Vitamin C.

Obviously, when a single serving supplies a lot better than the current RDA of vitamin C, it is an ‘exceptional’ source, at least in my view!

The half ripe fruit of the camu camu, a shrubby tree of the Amazon, has the distinction of having the highest recorded levels of any fruit, surpassing even the highest levels recorded in the acerola. At 2.7 grams of ascorbic acid per 100 grams of fruit, the ascorbic acid content is nothing short of astounding! (‘Ascorbic acid’ is the technical term for vitamin C).

The values are for one whole fruit, but no one (that I would want to know) eats a whole medium sized watermelon at a sitting, so for these larger fruit the value is for a slice, a ‘slice’ being, very generally, about an eighth of a medium sized fruit, or a quarter of a ‘smaller’ fruit.
In the particular case of lemon and lime, the ‘slice’ value is juice of one wedge.
For a few small fruit, such as Kei apple, the ranking is adjusted upward where the fruit mg/100 gram analysis shows it has large amounts of vitamin C, but the small size of the fruit gives it a lower per fruit vitamin C content. You are likely to eat more than one at a serving. In the case of tiny fruit, like red or black currants, a lot more, but probably still only 20-30 raw fruit, especially if they are a bit acid..

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You won’t find these fruit in the shops. They are natural environment fruits that we have not domesticated for one reason or another. Most will never be domesticated. Some can be grown at home in the backyard.

Asimina fruits range in vitamin C content from about 7mg/100 grams edible to about 21mg/100 grams, depending on the variety. Therefore some varieties are a ‘good’ source of vitamin C, others are a ‘very good’ source.

Apple, apricot, avacado ,banana,biliberry, beaad fruit,black currant, blueberry,custard apple,grape, guava,fig,keiapple, ,kiwifruit, lemon,lychee,mango,melon,peach,pineapple,plun,rasberry,sapodila,strawberry, tomato,watermelon, etc., are the fruits with rich vitamin c.

The values are for one whole fruit, but no one (that I would want to know) eats a whole medium sized watermelon at a sitting, so for these larger fruit the value is for a slice, a ‘slice’ being, very generally, about an eighth of a medium sized fruit, or a quarter of a ‘smaller’ fruit.
In the particular case of lemon and lime, the ‘slice’ value is juice of one wedge.
For a few small fruit, such as Kei apple, the ranking is adjusted upward where the fruit mg/100 gram analysis shows it has large amounts of vitamin C, but the small size of the fruit gives it a lower per fruit vitamin C content. You are likely to eat more than one at a serving. In the case of tiny fruit, like red or black currants, a lot more, but probably still only 20-30 raw fruit, especially if they are a bit acid..

Some of them , You won’t find these fruit in the shops. They are natural environment fruits that we have not domesticated for one reason or another. Most will never be domesticated. Some can be grown at home in the backyard.

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Asimina fruits range in vitamin C content from about 7mg/100 grams edible to about 21mg/100 grams, depending on the variety. Therefore some varieties are a ‘good’ source of vitamin C, others are a ‘very good’ source.

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