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Voice Against Gender Biased Laws and Family Breaking FemiNAZIs.

HOW FEMINISTS MANAGED TO MAKE BIASED LAWS AGAINST MEN?

In today’s world most of the powerful positions, Countries presidents or organisations leaders are Men, but most of them are influenced, brainwashed by Propaganda, promotions of Women. Even some want to make it Gender neutral, but they face strong opposition from other Men.

Specially in India, they made to believe and act only for Women.

It is not accurate to say that Indian law is biased towards men. India has made significant strides towards gender equality in the past few decades, with the passage of several laws and policies aimed at protecting women’s rights and advancing their social, economic, and political status.

However, it is true that there is still some gender-based inequalities that persist in Indian society, which can sometimes be reflected in the law. For example, there have been instances where certain laws and legal provisions have been interpreted or applied in a manner that appears to be more favourable to men than women.

One such example is the provision in the Indian Penal Code that allows for a husband to be exempt from prosecution for rape if the victim is his wife and she is above the age of 15. This provision has been widely criticized for perpetuating the idea that a woman’s consent is not required in a marital relationship and for providing legal cover for marital rape.

However, it is important to note that there have been efforts to reform or eliminate such provisions and make Indian law more gender-neutral and progressive. For instance, in 2019, the Indian parliament passed the Triple Talaq bill, which criminalized the practice of instant divorce in Muslim communities and provided greater protection to Muslim women in divorce proceedings.

In conclusion, while there may be some areas where gender-based biases continue to exist in Indian law, there are also ongoing efforts to address these issues and promote gender equality.

Indian law recognizes that false allegations of a criminal offense can be harmful and damaging to a person’s reputation and can have serious legal consequences. There are several provisions in Indian law that protect men from false allegations made by women.

Section 498A of the Indian Penal Code: This section deals with the offense of cruelty by a husband or his relatives towards a woman. However, it also includes a provision that protects men from false accusations. The section states that if a woman makes a false complaint of cruelty against her husband or his relatives, she can be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to three years and/or a fine.

Section 182 of the Indian Penal Code: This section deals with the offense of giving false information to a public servant. If a woman gives false information to the police or any other public servant with the intent to cause injury or harm to a man, she can be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to six months, or with a fine, or both.

Section 211 of the Indian Penal Code: This section deals with the offense of making a false charge of an offense with the intent to cause injury to a person. If a woman makes a false charge of an offense against a man with the intent to cause injury or harm, she can be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to two years, or with a fine, or both.

It is important to note that while these provisions exist to protect men from false allegations made by women, it is equally important to ensure that genuine cases of harassment or abuse are not ignored or dismissed. It is the responsibility of the police and the judiciary to ensure that the law is applied fairly and impartially in all cases, without any gender-based bias.

It is not accurate to say that Indian feminists as a whole oppose making laws gender neutral. In fact, many feminists in India advocate for gender-neutral laws that treat all individuals equally, regardless of their gender.

However, there may be some feminists who are concerned that making certain laws gender-neutral could have unintended consequences or could undermine efforts to address gender-based inequalities. For example, there may be concerns that making laws related to sexual harassment or domestic violence gender-neutral could dilute the specific protections that these laws provide to women who are disproportionately affected by these issues.

Furthermore, some feminists may argue that gender-neutral laws are not always sufficient to address the specific experiences and needs of women, who have historically faced systemic discrimination and oppression. In such cases, there may be a need for targeted policies and programs that consider the unique challenges and vulnerabilities faced by women.

However, it is important to note that these concerns do not represent the views of all feminists in India, and there is a wide range of opinions and perspectives on this issue within the feminist movement. Ultimately, the goal of feminism is to achieve gender equality and ensure that all individuals, regardless of their gender, can enjoy their fundamental human rights and freedoms.

As I mentioned earlier, it is not accurate to say that Indian feminists as a whole oppose making laws gender neutral. However, there may be some feminists who have concerns about the potential impact of gender-neutral laws on gender-based inequalities.

Some of the concerns that have been raised by feminists in India about gender-neutral laws include:

Dilution of specific protections for women: There may be concerns that making laws related to sexual harassment or domestic violence gender-neutral could dilute the specific protections that these laws provide to women who are disproportionately affected by these issues. Some feminists argue that gender-specific laws are necessary to address the unique challenges faced by women.

Lack of sensitivity to gender-based inequalities: Some feminists argue that gender-neutral laws do not always consider the specific experiences and needs of women, who have historically faced systemic discrimination and oppression. In such cases, there may be a need for targeted policies and programs that consider the unique challenges and vulnerabilities faced by women.

Undermining efforts to address gender-based inequalities: Some feminists may argue that gender-neutral laws could undermine efforts to address gender-based inequalities by failing to recognize and address the specific challenges faced by women.

It is important to note that these concerns do not represent the views of all feminists in India, and there is a wide range of opinions and perspectives on this issue within the feminist movement. Ultimately, the goal of feminism is to achieve gender equality and ensure that all individuals, regardless of their gender, can enjoy their fundamental human rights and freedoms.

Indian feminists, as a whole, are opposed to making laws for men. In fact, many feminists in India advocate for laws that treat all individuals equally, regardless of their gender.

However, there may be some feminists who have concerns about the potential impact of laws for men on gender-based inequalities. Rather than using tactics to oppose laws for men, these feminists may advocate for a more nuanced approach that considers the specific experiences and needs of different genders.

It is important to recognize that feminism is a diverse movement with a wide range of opinions and perspectives. While there may be some feminists who are critical of laws for men, it is inaccurate to suggest that they use specific tactics to oppose them. Instead, feminists in India, like elsewhere, work to promote gender equality and ensure that all individuals, regardless of their gender, can enjoy their fundamental human rights and freedoms.

The Indian family court system is known to be slow and overburdened with cases, and both men and women may face difficulties in obtaining justice and fair outcomes in their cases.

In recent years, there have been calls to reform the Indian family court system to make it more efficient and effective, and to ensure that both men and women have access to fair and timely justice. Some of the specific challenges that men may face in the family court system include difficulties in obtaining custody of their children, unfair treatment in cases related to divorce and property disputes, and limited support for men facing domestic violence or other forms of abuse.

It is important to recognize that gender-based inequalities and biases can impact both men and women in the family court system, and that efforts are needed to ensure that all individuals are able to access justice and receive fair outcomes in their cases.

It is not appropriate to compare Indian family courts to Auschwitz, as Auschwitz was a concentration camp where millions of people were systematically murdered during the Holocaust. Such a comparison is offensive and trivializes the horrors of the Holocaust.

While it is true that some men in India may face difficulties in obtaining justice in family court cases, it is important to recognize that such challenges are not unique to men, and that both men and women may face difficulties in navigating the Indian family court system. The Indian family court system is known to be overburdened with cases, and delays and inefficiencies in the system can result in frustration and difficulties for all parties involved.

It is important to engage in constructive dialogue and work towards addressing the challenges faced by individuals in the family court system, without resorting to inflammatory or offensive language. Such language does not contribute to constructive dialogue or meaningful solutions.

In India, custody of children is determined on a case-by-case basis and is based on the best interests of the child. There is no clear data available on the percentage of mothers versus fathers who are granted custody of children in India, as custody decisions are made on a case-by-case basis.

Traditionally, Indian society has placed a strong emphasis on the role of mothers in raising children, and this may influence custody decisions in some cases. However, the Indian judiciary has also recognized the importance of the role of fathers in the upbringing of children, and there have been cases where fathers have been granted custody of their children.

It is important to note that custody decisions in India are made based on a variety of factors, including the child’s age, health, and well-being, as well as the ability of each parent to provide a safe and stable environment for the child. The court also considers the wishes of the child, if they are of a certain age and maturity level.

Ultimately, the goal of custody decisions in India is to ensure the best interests of the child are served, and this may involve granting custody to either the mother or father, depending on the specific circumstances of the case.

In India, custody decisions are made on a case-by-case basis and are based on the best interests of the child. While some fathers in India may face difficulties in obtaining custody of their children, it is important to recognize that custody decisions are not based solely on the gender of the parent.

Traditionally, Indian society has placed a strong emphasis on the role of mothers in raising children, and this may influence custody decisions in some cases. However, the Indian judiciary has also recognized the importance of the role of fathers in the upbringing of children, and there have been cases where fathers have been granted custody of their children.

There may be several reasons why some fathers in India may face difficulties in obtaining custody of their children. These may include factors such as limited financial resources, difficulties in balancing work and childcare responsibilities, or cultural expectations that prioritize the role of mothers in child-rearing.

It is important to note that custody decisions in India are made based on a variety of factors, including the child’s age, health, and well-being, as well as the ability of each parent to provide a safe and stable environment for the child. The court also considers the wishes of the child, if they are of a certain age and maturity level.

Ultimately, the goal of custody decisions in India is to ensure the best interests of the child are served, and this may involve granting custody to either the mother or father, depending on the specific circumstances of the case.

In India, divorce laws are governed by the Hindu Marriage Act, which provides for the payment of maintenance or alimony to the wife in certain circumstances. Under the Act, either spouse may seek maintenance from the other if they are unable to support themselves, or if they have been deserted by their spouse.

The Act also provides for maintenance to be paid in cases of adultery, although this is a matter of judicial discretion and is not mandatory. In cases of adultery, the court may consider a variety of factors, such as the financial needs of the wife, the conduct of the parties, and the ability of the husband to pay.

It is important to note that the payment of maintenance in divorce cases is not intended as a punishment for wrongdoing, but rather as a means of providing for the financial needs of the spouse who is unable to support themselves. The goal is to ensure that both parties can maintain a reasonable standard of living following the divorce.

It is also worth noting that Indian law recognizes that both men and women may face financial difficulties following a divorce, and provisions are made for either spouse to seek maintenance depending on their financial situation. While there have been some cases where men have been required to pay maintenance to their wives, this is not unique to India and is a common feature of divorce laws in many countries around the world.

irony of this law, is so far from history of Indian legal system not a single man was granted maintenance under this law.

Under Indian law, both husbands and wives have a legal obligation to support each other during the marriage and after divorce. The payment of alimony or maintenance to a spouse who is unable to support themselves is a provision under the Hindu Marriage Act, which is applicable to Hindus, Buddhists, Jains, and Sikhs.

When it comes to the payment of alimony or maintenance, the law does not distinguish between fault or no-fault divorce. The court considers various factors such as the income and financial status of both spouses, their earning capacity, the length of the marriage, the age and health of both spouses, and the standard of living enjoyed by the spouses during the marriage.

If the court finds that the wife is unable to maintain herself, then the court may order the husband to pay alimony or maintenance to the wife. Similarly, if the husband is unable to maintain himself, the court may order the wife to pay alimony or maintenance to the husband.

The payment of alimony or maintenance is not meant to punish either spouse for their actions, but rather to ensure that both spouses are able to maintain a reasonable standard of living following the divorce. It is important to note that the amount of alimony or maintenance to be paid is determined on a case-by-case basis and considers the specific circumstances of each case.

but funny thing is most of the judgments forcing men to pay maintenance saying “BEG BORROW OR STEAL BUT PAY

It is not appropriate or legal to encourage or condone illegal activities such as stealing to pay alimony or maintenance to a spouse. However, it is important to recognize that under Indian law, the payment of alimony or maintenance to a spouse is a legal obligation and failure to comply with a court order to pay maintenance can result in legal consequences.

While divorce can be a difficult and emotionally charged process, it is important for both spouses to approach the process in a mature and responsible manner. This includes complying with court orders and fulfilling legal obligations such as the payment of alimony or maintenance.

In cases where a spouse is unable to pay the full amount of alimony or maintenance ordered by the court, there may be options to seek modification of the order or to negotiate a payment plan that is more manageable. It is always advisable to seek the assistance of a qualified legal professional in these situations.

Ultimately, the goal of alimony or maintenance payments is to ensure that both spouses can maintain a reasonable standard of living following the divorce. While it can be a challenging and sometimes contentious process, it is important to approach it with a level head and a willingness to work towards a fair and equitable resolution.

Family court judgments in India, including those related to maintenance, are based on a variety of factors including the income and financial status of both spouses, their earning capacity, the length of the marriage, the age and health of both spouses, and the standard of living enjoyed by the spouses during the marriage. The court considers the specific circumstances of each case and decides based on the facts presented.

While it is true that in many cases, maintenance judgments in favour of women are more common, this is not necessarily due to bias against men. Rather, it may be due to factors such as the fact that women are often the primary caregivers of children and are therefore more likely to face financial difficulties following a divorce.

It is also important to recognize that maintenance judgments are not meant to be punitive or to assign blame for the breakdown of the marriage. Instead, they are intended to ensure that both spouses can maintain a reasonable standard of living following the divorce.

It is always advisable to seek the assistance of a qualified legal professional if you are facing a maintenance judgment or are involved in a family court case. A lawyer can help you understand your legal rights and obligations and can assist you in presenting your case effectively to the court.

Under Indian law, the payment of maintenance is not dependent on the education or employment status of the spouse. Rather, it is based on the legal obligation of both spouses to support each other during the marriage and after divorce. If a court finds that a spouse is unable to support themselves following a divorce, the court may order the other spouse to pay alimony or maintenance.

It is important to recognize that the amount of alimony or maintenance to be paid is determined on a case-by-case basis and considers the specific circumstances of each case. While a highly qualified, working woman may be able to support herself, there may be other factors such as the length of the marriage or the financial contributions of the other spouse that could lead the court to order the payment of maintenance.

Ultimately, the goal of alimony or maintenance payments is to ensure that both spouses can maintain a reasonable standard of living following the divorce. While it can be difficult for a spouse to pay maintenance to an ex-spouse who is highly qualified and capable, it is important to approach the situation in a mature and responsible manner and to fulfil legal obligations to avoid potential legal consequences.

It is difficult to determine the exact percentage of false dowry cases under Section 498A of the Indian Penal Code (IPC), as there is no accurate data available on the matter. However, it is widely recognized that there are some cases where false accusations are made under Section 498A.

There are several reasons why false dowry cases may be filed, including personal vendettas, disputes between spouses or families, and the desire to gain an advantage in divorce or child custody proceedings. Some people may also file false cases to extort money from the accused or to seek revenge.

It is important to note that while false cases of dowry harassment can cause harm to the accused, it is also important to recognize that dowry harassment is a serious issue in India and can have devastating consequences for victims. The purpose of Section 498A is to protect women from harassment and abuse related to dowry demands, and it is important to take steps to address this issue while also ensuring that the rights of the accused are protected.

In recent years, there have been efforts to reform Section 498A to prevent false cases and ensure that the law is used appropriately. These efforts have included the introduction of measures such as mandatory counselling before filing a complaint, stricter penalties for filing false complaints, and the establishment of special courts to handle dowry cases.

It is not accurate to say that most dowry cases under the Dowry Prohibition Act, Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act (PWDVA), or domestic violence cases are false. It is important to recognize that dowry harassment and domestic violence are serious issues in India, and that there are many cases where women are subjected to physical, emotional, and economic abuse by their spouses or in-laws.

However, it is also true that there are some cases where false allegations of dowry harassment or domestic violence are made. These false allegations may be made for a variety of reasons, such as to gain an advantage in divorce or custody proceedings, to seek revenge or to extort money from the accused.

It is important to approach each case on an individual basis and to ensure that both the rights of the victim and the accused are protected. The legal system should work to ensure that genuine victims of domestic violence or dowry harassment receive the necessary support and protection, while also taking steps to prevent false accusations and to ensure that the rights of the accused are protected.

In recent years, there have been efforts to address the issue of false accusations in dowry harassment and domestic violence cases. These efforts have included measures such as mandatory counselling before filing a complaint, stricter penalties for filing false complaints, and the establishment of special courts to handle these cases.

It is not accurate to say that all Indian feminists oppose making laws in favour of men. Feminism is a diverse movement, and there are many different perspectives within feminism. While some feminists may be sceptical of laws that are explicitly framed as being in favour of men, others may support laws that address issues that disproportionately affect men, such as gender-based violence, mental health, or workplace discrimination.

However, it is important to recognize that the focus of feminism is often on addressing issues of gender inequality and the ways in which women have been historically disadvantaged and discriminated against. Feminists may be concerned that laws that are explicitly framed as being in favor of men may distract from or undermine efforts to address gender-based discrimination against women.

Additionally, some feminists may be concerned that laws that are framed as being in favor of men may perpetuate or reinforce patriarchal power structures that have historically disadvantaged women. This is not to say that men do not face issues related to gender discrimination and inequality, but rather that some feminists may view these issues as being part of a larger systemic problem that needs to be addressed holistically.

It is important to have open and constructive dialogue about these issues, and to work towards creating a legal framework that promotes gender equality and justice for all.

That being said, it is important to recognize that there are some individuals who identify as feminists who may use tactics that are perceived as being unfair or biased against men. However, it is not productive to generalize or stereotype all feminists based on the actions of a few individuals.

It is important to approach these issues in a constructive and inclusive manner, and to work towards creating a legal system that promotes gender equality and justice for all. This may involve engaging in dialogue with feminists and other stakeholders to better understand their perspectives, and to work towards finding solutions that address the concerns of all parties involved.

The issue of child custody and visitation in India is complex and there are no reliable official statistics on the percentage of fathers who are granted custody or visitation rights. However, it is true that there is a perception that fathers in India are less likely to be granted custody or visitation rights than mothers.

One of the reasons for this perception may be that there is a strong cultural bias in favour of mothers when it comes to parenting and childcare. Additionally, many Indian laws and court judgments have historically relied upon the assumption that women are the primary caregivers for children.

However, there have been some recent legal developments in India that are aimed at promoting gender-neutral custody and visitation arrangements. For example, the 2019 amendments to the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956, allow for joint custody of children in cases of divorce or separation. Additionally, the Supreme Court of India has issued judgments that recognize the importance of father-child relationships and encourage the involvement of both parents in the upbringing of their children.

It is important to recognize that each case is unique, and that custody and visitation arrangements should be made based on the best interests of the child, taking into account factors such as the child’s age, gender, and special needs, as well as the ability of each parent to provide for the child’s physical, emotional, and psychological well-being.

It is not accurate to say that all women who kill their husbands or partners are automatically called victims. Each case is unique and must be evaluated on its own merits.

However, it is important to recognize that women may face unique challenges and vulnerabilities that can contribute to situations of domestic violence or abuse. Women may be more likely to experience physical, emotional, or economic abuse from their partners, and may also face barriers to seeking help or leaving an abusive relationship.

Additionally, in cases where a woman has killed her husband or partner, there may be a history of abuse or violence that contributed to her actions. This does not excuse or justify the act of killing, but it may be important to consider the context in which the killing occurred when evaluating the case.

It is important to approach each case with sensitivity and objectivity, and to avoid making assumptions or generalizations based on gender or other factors. The focus should be on promoting justice and safety for all individuals involved, regardless of their gender or other personal characteristics.

HOW FEMINISTS BLOCK ANY LAWS IN FAVOR OR EMPOWER MEN.

I cannot make sweeping generalizations or assumptions about a particular group of people or individuals. It is important to note that the aim of feminism is to achieve gender equality and empower all individuals, regardless of their gender. It is not about blocking the empowerment of any particular gender, including men.

While some people may have misconceptions about feminism, it is crucial to understand that feminism is not about hating men or discriminating against them. It is about challenging gender-based discrimination and promoting equal rights and opportunities for all individuals. Feminists believe that gender inequality harms both men and women and that working towards gender equality benefits everyone.

Therefore, any claims that feminists are blocking the empowerment of men are not representative of the core values and principles of feminism. Instead, feminists strive to create a more inclusive society where everyone can live and thrive equally, regardless of their gender.

This is how Feminists portrait themself, but in reality, they oppose any gender equal laws or and schemes from the Government.

Indian Feminists claim they are working towards Gender equality. I cannot claim that Indian feminists have made specific laws. However, feminists in India have been actively advocating for the promotion of gender equality and the elimination of gender-based discrimination through legal reforms and policy changes.

In recent years, there have been significant legal reforms in India aimed at promoting gender equality and addressing issues such as violence against women, discrimination, and unequal opportunities. Some of these laws include:

The Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition and Redressal) Act, 2013: This law seeks to prevent sexual harassment of women in the workplace and provides a framework for addressing complaints of sexual harassment.

The Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005: This law recognizes domestic violence as a criminal offense and provides protection and support to women who experience domestic violence.

The Maternity Benefit (Amendment) Act, 2017: This law increases the period of maternity leave for women from 12 weeks to 26 weeks and provides for maternity leave for adoptive and commissioning mothers.

The Prohibition of Child Marriage Act, 2006: This law prohibits the marriage of girls under the age of 18 and boys under the age of 21, recognizing that child marriage is a violation of the rights of the child.

These laws are a result of the efforts made by feminists and women’s rights activists in India, who have been advocating for gender equality and the elimination of gender-based discrimination. While there is still much work to be done, these legal reforms are an important step towards achieving gender equality in India.

but none of any laws they supported are Gender equal, making one sided law which favour only women is Gender equal as per Feminists.

According to data from the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB), men in India are more likely to die by suicide than women. In 2019, the suicide rate among men in India was 15.9 per 100,000, while the rate among women was 7.4 per 100,000. This is a significant gender disparity that needs to be addressed.

Several factors contribute to the higher suicide rate among men in India, including social and cultural factors, economic pressures, and mental health issues. However, suicide is a complex issue, and there is no single solution to addressing it.

It is important for policymakers and society as a whole to recognize the issue of suicide among men and work towards creating a more supportive and inclusive environment for individuals struggling with mental health issues. This includes promoting mental health awareness, reducing the stigma around mental illness, and providing access to mental health services and support.

Maneka Gandhi is an Indian politician and animal rights activist who has served as a member of parliament and a cabinet minister in India. once she said she never hear suicide among men in India.

This is another Feminists tactic deny any crime or atrocities on men.

The National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) is an Indian government agency responsible for collecting and analysing crime data in India. The NCRB collects data on both men and women who are victims of crime, including suicide.

As I mentioned earlier, the NCRB has reported that men in India are more likely to die by suicide than women. In fact, the NCRB’s data on suicide is often cited in discussions and research on the issue of suicide in India.

It is possible that there may be some confusion or misinformation about the NCRB’s data collection methods or the data itself. However, it is important to recognize that the NCRB does collect and report data on both men and women, and their data on suicide rates indicates that men in India are at a higher risk of dying by suicide than women.

other than suicide of men, there is no other data collected by NCRB on men like

crime by Women, Murders committed by Women, Domestic Violence on Men, as there are no options or laws as such.

for centuries All men Empowered themself without any support from Government, or any freebies. but for last 5 decades Women are getting all laws in their favour, freebies, schemes only for them but they still claim none of the women is empowered.

Feminists successfully manged to block all laws, freebies, schemes for men claiming they are victims.

Their tactics are as listed:

Show all men are criminals and all Women are victims. Make laws only for Women saying its gender equal. Deny Men are victims, Stop Crime data on men committed by Women. (NCRB in India)

Feminists always claim they worked for Gender equal society.

Advocacy for gender-neutral policies and laws: Feminist activists have often fought for policies and laws that benefit both men and women, such as equal pay, parental leave, and access to healthcare. These policies and laws aim to create a more equitable and inclusive society for all individuals, regardless of their gender. There is PWDVA only for Women, but Men cannot complain not he get any relief.

Addressing toxic masculinity: Feminist activists have also worked to address harmful societal attitudes and behaviours associated with toxic masculinity. This includes promoting healthy forms of masculinity, encouraging emotional vulnerability, and advocating for mental health resources for men. Feminist always claim Women are Victims and Men are villains.

Fighting gender-based violence: Feminist activists have been at the forefront of the movement to address gender-based violence, including violence against men. Many feminist organizations and advocates work to raise awareness about the prevalence of violence against men and to provide support and resources to survivors. There is not a single equal law which Women has.

Challenging gender stereotypes: Feminist activists also work to challenge harmful gender stereotypes that impact both men and women. This includes advocating for more diverse and inclusive representation in media and popular culture and promoting positive and healthy gender norms.

Feminists always Challenge men in every field where there is no responsibility. they are not ready to take challenging jobs, they only want easy returns without many efforts.

but none of the above are Gender equal.

Cry Victim and get all Freebies, Quota, reservation, Schemes, benefits, positions, jobs, maintenance, custody etc.

There is UN WOMEN but no UN MEN.

There is WCD/NCW (India) None for MEN.

All Freebies, Quota, reservation, Schemes only for Women, none for MEN.

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN USING AI (CHATgpt)
SOURCE : https://mensrights.in/biased-laws/

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